Summers and Stiglitz Headline Upcoming Museum Events -

 

Evening Lecture Series


A Conversation with Albert Gallatin
A Conversation with Albert Gallatin
Thursday, January 29, 2015, 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM

Albert Gallatin is perhaps best remembered as the nation’s longest-serving Secretary of the Treasury. Yet his service to the country is far longer and broader than his 13 years in this post. Join us on the anniversary of Gallatin’s birth to meet the man himself through the historical interpretation of Ron Duquette.

Talk followed by Q&A and reception. Admission is free for Museum members and students, or $15 for non-members. Register today.

Evening Lecture Series


“Bitcoin and the Future of Payments Technology” Fireside Chat with Lawrence H. Summers and Panel Discussion
“Bitcoin and the Future of Payments Technology” Fireside Chat with Lawrence H. Summers and Panel Discussion
Wednesday, February 11, 2015, 5:15 PM to 7:15 PM

Join us for a timely discussion about bitcoin and the future of payments technology featuring a fireside chat with former US Treasury Secretary Lawrence H. Summers conducted by Michael Casey, followed by a panel discussion featuring Jeremy Allaire, Lawrence Goodman and Paul Vigna. This event will coincide with the launch of Casey and Vigna's new book, The Age of Cryptocurrency: How Bitcoin and Digital Money are Challenging the Global Economic Order.

Presentation will be followed by Q&A, book signing and reception. Admission is free for Museum members and students, or $15 for non-members. Reservations required. Register today.

Lunch and Learn


Bruce Smart on
Bruce Smart on "People on US Banknotes, 1861-1928: The Famous, The Familiar, The Forgotten"
Thursday, February 12, 2015, 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM

Join us for a lunchtime talk with currency expert Dr. Bruce Edmund Smart on the familiar and not-so-familiar faces that grace our paper money.

Talk followed by Q&A. $5 tickets include Museum admission; Members and students free. Register today.

Lunch and Learn


Mary Pilon on
Mary Pilon on "The Monopolists"
Tuesday, February 24, 2015, 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM

In The Monopolists: Obsession, Fury and the Scandal Behind the World’s Favorite Board Game, award-winning journalist Mary Pilon reveals the unknown story of how Monopoly came into existence, the reinvention of its history, the lost female originator of the game and one man’s lifelong obsession to tell the true story about the game’s questionable origins. A remarkable social history of corporate greed that illuminates the cutthroat nature of American business over the last century, the story told in The Monopolists parallels the game itself: winners, losers, controversial moves and obsession.

Talk followed by Q&A and book signing. $5 tickets include Museum admission; Members and students free. Register today.

Launch Party


Book Launch of
Book Launch of "Genealogy of American Finance"
Tuesday, March 10, 2015, 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM

Join the Museum and Columbia Business School Publishing for a reception to celebrate the launch of the Museum's new book, Genealogy of American Finance, by Robert E. Wright and Richard Sylla.

In this unique, gorgeously illustrated book, readers learn how 50 financial corporations came to dominate the US banking system and their impact on the nation’s political, social and economic growth. A story that spans more than two centuries of war, crisis and opportunity, this account reminds readers that American banking was never a fixed enterprise but has evolved in tandem with the country.

This event is open to Museum members, press and invited guests. For information, contact Kristin Aguilera at kaguilera@moaf.org.

Evening Lecture Series


"A Force for Good" Panel Discussion
Wednesday, March 18, 2015, 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM

After 2008, the social contract between the financial industry and everyone else was badly broken. Since then, banks have paid out billion-dollar settlements and Congress has passed some new laws, but a deeper rapprochement is still missing. In A Force for Good, John Taft has gathered some of the greatest financial minds to explore how Wall Street can harness the same creative energy that invented credit default swaps and channel it towards the public good — in the form of a stable retirement system, investment strategies that protect the environment and reward responsible corporate behavior, and a financial industry with a culture of ethics, integrity and client focus. Featured panelists include Charles Ellis, Barbara Novick, John Rogers and John Taft.

Panel discussion will be moderated by Dr. Richard Sylla and will be followed by Q&A and reception. Admission is free for Museum members and students, or $15 for non-members. Register today.

Evening Lecture Series


Nobel Laureate Joseph Stiglitz on
Nobel Laureate Joseph Stiglitz on "The Great Divide"
Tuesday, April 21, 2015, 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM

Join us for an evening with Nobel Prize-winning economist, bestselling author and Columbia University professor Joseph Stiglitz on his new book, The Great Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them.

A call to restore true democracy and tempered markets, The Great Divide makes an urgent case for Americans to solve inequality now. A singular voice of reason in an era defined by bitter politics and economic uncertainty, Stiglitz has time and again diagnosed America's greatest economic challenges, from the Great Recession and its feeble recovery to the yawning gap between the rich and the poor.

Talk will be followed by Q&A, book signing and reception. Admission is free for Museum members and students, or $15 for non-members. Reservations required. Register today.

Lunch and Learn


Harley Spiller on
Harley Spiller on "Keep the Change"
Wednesday, April 29, 2015, 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM

Harley J. Spiller – the Museum's own “Inspector Collector” – began collecting money at age five when, home sick from school, his father tossed him a sack of pennies and a Whitman coin folder. In the five decades since, Spiller has amassed one of America’s most extensive collections of unusual financial artifacts, as well as a wealth of anecdotes and quirky historical details about US currency.

In Keep the Change, Spiller explains why greenbacks are green, what happens to worn-out bills, how artists navigate the fine line between art and mutilation and whether it’s ever acceptable to burn money.

Talk followed by Q&A and book signing. $5 tickets include Museum admission; Members and students free. Register today.

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